Cannes Day 5: Bad melodrama and ‘Mon Roi’

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Director Maiwenn (R) and cast member Vincent Cassel react during a news conference for the film "Mon roi" in competition at the 68th Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, May 17, 2015. REUTERS/Yves Herman
Director Maiwenn (R) and cast member Vincent Cassel react during a news conference for the film "Mon roi" in competition at the 68th Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, May 17, 2015.       REUTERS/Yves Herman

Director Maiwenn (R) and cast member Vincent Cassel react during a news conference for the film “Mon roi” in competition at the 68th Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France, May 17, 2015. REUTERS/Yves Herman

I might be in the minority, but I couldn’t stand Maiwenn’s latest movie, “Mon Roi,” which premiered in the Cannes competition on Sunday.

It’s self-indulgent claptrap about a failed romance and marriage.

The movie focuses on Tony (French actress and director Emmanuelle Bercot), who falls madly in love with Georgio (Vincent Cassel.) She’s a lawyer, and when Georgio looks impressed, Tony’s sister says that he must not be accustomed to meeting people who are intellectuals. Excuse me! Since when did being a lawyer put you in the intellectual class?
Oh well. I can overlook that stupidity, but such silliness keeps piling up. Both of the characters are at least in the late 30s or early 40s, and by that time, you should be able to have literate conversations that don’t dwell on possible sexual inadequacies. But in the first romp in the sack, poor Tony starts crying, wondering whether her vagina is too big. Really?
But they still act cute, and Georgio assures Tony that she’s perfect, and he woos her by showing us his fancy flat and his presumed wealth. She seems impressed, and they’re both goo-goo-eyed. Strangely, neither Tony nor Georgio talks much about work — an odd thing since both are presumably successful and committed to their careers. (He’s a restaurant owner.) It’s all about love and cuteness. They get numerous eye-rolling montages.
Georgio says he’s ready for a child. So he and Tony conceive, and then marry. But Georgio’s former lover tries to commit suicide when she hears about the pregnancy. And Georgio tends to the woman’s every need, causing much trouble with Tony.
All of these events are told in flashback, after we see Tony atop a snow-covered mountain, skiing perilously fast down the slope. In the next scene, she’s in a rehab hospital for a seriously messed-up knee, and she’s reflecting on her life with Georgio while going through physical therapy.
So the question becomes: Will Tony be healed, both physically and mentally? If you’ve bought into the story and feel that it rings true, then you will care. I did not. I just wanted Tony and Georgio to shut up.

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